Německo už řeší, že díky nedohodě politických stran vzroste krize a budou se muset opakovat volby, zatímco druhá největší banka Francie Société Générale požádala Front National - stranu Le Penové, aby uzavřela všechny své účty a přešla jinam.

 

 

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    Časopis The Economist, který je kontrolovaný Rothshildy, v lednovém čísle 1988 tvrdil, že v roce 2018 bude jedna světová měna. Tzn. před 30 lety chtěli Rothshildové jednotnou měnu, ale teď se naopak snaží podkopat euro, úplný opak.

    COVER: “GET READY FOR A WORLD CURRENCY”
    Title of article: Get Ready for the Phoenix
    Source: Economist; 01/9/88, Vol. 306, pp 9-10
    THIRTY years from now, Americans, Japanese, Europeans, and people in many other rich countries, and some relatively poor ones will probably be paying for their shopping with the same currency. Prices will be quoted not in dollars, yen or D-marks but in, let’s say, the phoenix. The phoenix will be favoured by companies and shoppers because it will be more convenient than today’s national currencies, which by then will seem a quaint cause of much disruption to economic life in the last twentieth century.
    The new world economy
    The biggest change in the world economy since the early 1970’s is that flows of money have replaced trade in goods as the force that drives exchange rates. as a result of the relentless integration of the world’s financial markets, differences in national economic policies can disturb interest rates (or expectations of future interest rates) only slightly, yet still call forth huge transfers of financial assets from one country to another. These transfers swamp the flow of trade revenues in their effect on the demand and supply for different currencies, and hence in their effect on exchange rates. As telecommunications technology continues to advance, these transactions will be cheaper and faster still. With unco-ordinated economic policies, currencies can get only more volatile.
    ….
    In all these ways national economic boundaries are slowly dissolving. As the trend continues, the appeal of a currency union across at least the main industrial countries will seem irresistible to everybody except foreign-exchange traders and governments. In the phoenix zone, economic adjustment to shifts in relative prices would happen smoothly and automatically, rather as it does today between different regions within large economies (a brief on pages 74-75 explains how.) The absence of all currency risk would spur trade, investment and employment.

    The phoenix zone would impose tight constraints on national governments. There would be no such thing, for instance, as a national monetary policy. The world phoenix supply would be fixed by a new central bank, descended perhaps from the IMF. The world inflation rate – and hence, within narrow margins, each national inflation rate- would be in its charge. Each country could use taxes and public spending to offset temporary falls in demand, but it would have to borrow rather than print money to finance its budget deficit. With no recourse to the inflation tax, governments and their creditors would be forced to judge their borrowing and lending plans more carefully than they do today. This means a big loss of economic sovereignty, but the trends that make the phoenix so appealing are taking that sovereignty away in any case. Even in a world of more-or-less floating exchange rates, individual governments have seen their policy independence checked by an unfriendly outside world.

  • Návštěvník - Caryn Cowles

    It's really good to have read about this topic. Would like to read more of your writing soon! Do you custom essay australia for your blogs?